artist

Yukihito Masuura

Yukihito Masuura

Yukihito Masuura (b.1963) was born in Tokyo, Japan.
Yukihito moved to Paris on 1981. After working as an assistant to Guy Bourdin who had been creating evolutional photo for France VORGUE magazine, he started to shoot all sculptures of Aristide Bonaventure Jean Maillol.
Through the work of Maillol, Yukihito understood the importance of expressing objects in light and shade. The technique of capturing the beauty of sculpture is also linked to Antoine Bourdelle, François-auguste-rené Rodin and even the ambitious work of shooting Michelangelo’s works. Exhibition based on Michelangelo’s work, “GENESIS” was held in the Italy, Florence’s Casa Buonarotti, and the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography, as a solo exhibitions of artworks. It is the works pursuing the beauty of the form of a shadow-based Michelangelo sculpture by the natural light from a very small window without using the artificial light.
His works claims an entirely unique aesthetic beyond the artistry of the object sculpture. He is doing the shooting only with natural light. He wants to get rid of unwanted lights as much as possible. The photograph is an art cut out in the frame of the expression of rectangle. “I want to remove useless light for the pure beauty of light and shadow” Yukihito mentioned his key policy of his artisan. His photographs are purely light and shadow-like aesthetics.
From 2006, the two major shrines of the Japan, Ise Jingu and Izumo Taisha are taken as Yukihito’s decade work. These shrines, which have a history of 1000 years, has a tradition of rebuilding all facilities in every 60 years at Ise Jingu Shrine in 20 years. It is a traditional act with a deep meaning such as the succession of the technology and the securing of a continuous resource by the regular reproduction of the building and the equipment of the national treasure class. The daily life of the Japan has been shaped by almost natural material, such as wood, paper, and cloth. In addition, beauty that is close to the appearance of nature is the aesthetics of Japan tradition. The light in life was also natural. It is a culture to find beauty in eliminating unnecessary light as much as possible. Ise Jingu Shrine and Izumo Taisha have inherited the most sophisticated appearance of the beauty of Japan tradition. The decade has focused on photographing the aesthetic of Japan tradition, based on the beauty of nature which Japanese enjoying living with together in daily life.

To learn more about Yukihito Masuura, visit his website: http://www.masuura.com/en/